Use Let’s Encrypt certificates with Cockpit

After installing Cockpit you will likely end up with certificates that are self-signed and therefore untrusted by default. There is a better way; Let’s Encrypt. NOTE: Through out the article the fully-qualified domain name of the Cockpit server is treated as a variable (e.g., $FQDN). Make sure to either define a similar variable with an appropriate value or replace it when copying the commands. Install certbot First thing is first, install certbot1.
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Install Podman on Proxmox

Installing Podman on Proxmox is rather straight forward. The initial idea for how to do this came from a post on the Serve the Home (STH) blog: Create the Ultimate Virtualization and Container Setup (KVM, LXC, Docker) with Management GUIs. In that article STH uses Docker and provides a Portainer GUI. In this example the Portainer GUI is going to be omitted and use Podman instead of Docker. The daemonless part of Podman is the real selling point.
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Migrate Home Assistant to HassOS Running on Proxmox

Installing Home Assistant on Proxmox is relatively straightforward thanks to a script by Whiskerz007 on GitHub. I will not detail the steps here as they are pretty well documented both in the README and on the Home Assitant message boards. This topic is about migrating the data from an existing Home Assistant installation into HassOS. The complication is that HassOS mostly has a read-only file system and for whatever reason SCP is not working correctly.
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Install Patched EDID on Fedora

In another post I explained how to force a specific EDID on boot. It requires patching the initramfs to contain the EDID and then patching GRUB. On Fedora, this is slightly different. So I wanted to cover that here. Install Patched EDID Install the patched EDID (this example uses the pre-patched EDID attached here) and modify GRUB to use the new EDID. sudo mkdir -p /lib/firmware/edid cd /lib/firmware/edid sudo wget https://gist.
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Ubuntu 20.04 Root on ZFS

NOTE: This guide is adapted from the OpenZFS project Wiki on installing Ubuntu 18.04 Root on ZFS. In some of the steps there are very specific parameters that are specific to my build and my environment. This post is meant to document my configuration. Step 1: Prepare The Install Environment 1.1 Boot the Ubuntu Live CD. Select Try Ubuntu. Connect your system to the Internet as appropriate (e.g. join your WiFi network).
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